Many science rooms were in the midst of renovations throughout the summer. Rooms 231 and 236 were combined into one larger lab to better serve the needs of the science department.

Many science rooms were in the midst of renovations throughout the summer. Rooms 231 and 236 were both renovated to accommodate current lab practices and to better serve the needs of the science department. Photo by Lizzy Shpitalnik.

by Marisa Patwa, ’12

When students enter rooms 231 and 236 for their science class, they might be surprised to see a different view. These two rooms have been gutted and renovated to better meet the needs of students in science labs.

What was once two make-shift science classrooms with regular tables and chairs has been renovated to accommodate wood cabinetry with black soapstone countertops. Cabinetry also lines the walls of these rooms, allowing science teachers to better store equipment and supplies for science labs.  Room 236 includes sinks on its countertops, while Room 231—which was enlarged by knocking out an adjoining wall that once separated it from a teacher work area—accommodates several power outlets on each counter for students to experiment using electricity. Students can now move around freely in these rooms and experiment in what looks like a college-level science lab.

However, these are not the only rooms affected by the renovations. The ceilings and lighting in rooms 131, 136, and 138 have also been updated to allow for new wiring and plumbing in the revamped science rooms above them.

Principal Kip Greenhill said the renovations are a part of an ongoing plan to increase the productivity of students during science class, as well as to increase the amount of hands-on lab work and experiments. Other classrooms are scheduled for renovation next summer.

“For the next couple of years, we plan to reconstruct the science rooms to better fit the needs of the students,” Greenhill said.

Sophomore Matt Miely thinks this is a great idea as well.

“I think it will give us less time  for lectures,” Miely said, “and more time to experiment in new and creative ways.”